The DNS educational system as a device helping to prevent the spread of radicalisation in Malawi

Authors

  • Csaba Szeremley Africa Research Institute of Óbuda University
  • Péter Gergő Juhász Doctoral School on Safety and Security Sciences, University of Óbuda, Budapest

Keywords:

DNS educational system, radicalisation, Malawi, Mozambique

Abstract

In the last 5 years, extreme radicalisation has increased in the northern provinces of Mozambique leading to numerous violent acts. Malawi is only one province away from Cabo Delgado (where the outburst of violence is the most significant) and yet no terrorist attacks have been reported. However, it is very important to focus on Malawi as the rural settings of the “Warm Heart of Africa” and northern Mozambique are very similar. Both places have poor education and are stricken by poverty. In this article it is argued that however there are no undoubted arguments for it, still, good quality education can mitigate the chances of spreading extreme radicalisation through overcoming poverty and helping to give children a very strong moral ground and knowledge. A very effective teacher training system, the DNS is introduced. DNS means The Necessary Teacher Training College and was first established in Denmark in 1972. DNS has been operating in Malawi since 2003 and has significant achievements in training primary school teachers for rural posts.

Author Biography

Péter Gergő Juhász, Doctoral School on Safety and Security Sciences, University of Óbuda, Budapest

ORCID: 0000-0003-0729-6759

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Published

2022-01-09

How to Cite

Szeremley, C., & Juhász, P. G. (2022). The DNS educational system as a device helping to prevent the spread of radicalisation in Malawi. Journal of Central and Eastern European African Studies, 1(3). Retrieved from https://jceeas.bdi.uni-obuda.hu/index.php/jceeas/article/view/41

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Section

Articles